Join the Hardy Plant Society Find out how >

Spring's Cornucopia is out now. Order online here.

Recent Postings

Yoke's Salvia blog Chapter 4

The most easy, versatile ones for use in sunny borders or pots are which I call the ‘Shrubby, small leaved Salvias’. These are hardy to at least – 10 degr. C.  and much more than this in my experience.

0 comments on this article - view comments
Shade Monthly January 2019

I think I have mentioned before that I have been slowly trying to acquire a collection of hybrids and varieties of Arum italicum. This has not been aided by the fact that some mammals, probably squirrels, have taken to digging up newly planted forms and devouring the bulbs ...

Read more ...

0 comments on this article - view comments
On the Menu for ...April 2019

Far be it from me to flaunt my fritillaries, but this year they have been surprising on two counts

0 comments on this article - view comments
On a Chalk Hillside April 2019

Jerusalem artichokes (Helianthus tuberosus) are members of the sunflower family, and in this garden behave like any hardy perennial, dying back in the winter from their statuesque stems up to 3 meters tall with their tubers sprouting again in March/April.  They have lovely flowers like sunflowers too.  You can grow them as a wind break in the garden to protect more delicate plants.

0 comments on this article - view comments
My Wildlife Allotment April 2019
Spring has arrived on the allotment. After coming back from a week's holiday to Gran Canaria in the second half of March I was surprised to find the allotment so much greener and with flowers opening everywhere. Many of the perennials are coming back to life now and often the first thing I do when v..
0 comments on this article - view comments
Pulmonarias Booklet Launched

Pulmonarias have a long history in European gardens and are easily recognised in spring by their spotted leaves and pink and blue flowers on the same plant. There are pulmonarias in most gardens, and now is when they are at their best - the perfect foil for sp..

1 comments on this article - view comments
On the Menu for ...March 2019

I am very fond of early flowering shrubs, not simply for their form and colour, but for all they have to offer to wildlife. Chaenomeles speciosa ‘Falconnet Charlet’ and Chaenomeles speciosa ‘Nivalis’ have been flowering and attracting pollinators for weeks - in the case of ‘Falconnet Charlet’ since 2018!

3 comments on this article - view comments
On a Chalk Hillside March 2019

 Like most gardeners I almost never sit in my garden relaxing - we rest on various benches during our labours for a cup of tea or coffee for a short time, seeing all that needs doing.   Consequently I wanted something to look at all through the year as well as scent and colour.

0 comments on this article - view comments
My Wildlife Allotment March 2019

The earliest crocuses to come out are normally yellow Crocus crysanthus and pale purple C. tommasinianus, followed by later-flowering dark purple Crocus vernus. Crocuses are very useful food plants for early pollinators such as bumblebee queens, solitary bees and hoverflies ...

0 comments on this article - view comments
Yoke's Salvia blog Chapter 3

Here in Britain we had Pat Vlasto, Beth Chatto, Beryl Davies (from former Probus Demonstration Garden in Cornwall) and later Christine Yeo to thank for the wonderful pioneering work the'd done with salvias. We now have two lovely salvias to at least honour Pat in Salvia x jamensis 'Pat Vlasto' and Salvia 'Christine Yeo', which is, what I always believed,  a tough cross of S. microphylla and S. chamaedryoides.

0 comments on this article - view comments
Shade Monthly December 2018: Heucheroids

Bergenia emeiensis is a relatively recent introduction from Sichuan where it grows in shady places. The narrow, obovate leaves are relatively small (to about 12 cm). In the form we grow it has charming, light pink flowers in the spring ...

Read more ...

 

 

0 comments on this article - view comments
March Conservation Feature

Penstemon 'Margery Fish' AGM is a hardy, semi-evergreen perennial with narrow, slightly glossy leaves and slender dense panicles of purple-tinged pale blue flowers up to 3cm in length.

2 comments on this article - view comments
On a Chalk Hillside February 2019

Generally each year I have two or three concerted efforts to cut back or pull out the brambles down the boundaries, once in the winter, again in later spring, and hopefully during the summer as well, which creates cuttings material (ie the honeysuckles branches snap off as I pull out the brambles) but does not eradicate the brambles, which are growing in and through the roots of the other shrubs and climbers.

0 comments on this article - view comments
My Wildlife Allotment February 2019
Despite the cold weather many of the early spring bulbs are flowering now. The winter aconites look pretty but have not spread out much. I think they would rather prefer to grow in a woodland setting, but until the trees I have planted have grown taller the winter aconites have to put up with growin..
0 comments on this article - view comments
Shade Monthly November 2018

The most successful of the saxifrages is ‘Rubrifolia’. As the name suggests, the relatively large leaves are tinted red, but you cannot see this once the plant is in flower as it is covered in a white froth of petals. It is relatively easy...

Read more ...

 

0 comments on this article - view comments
Yoke's Salvia blog Chapters 1&2

This year I would like to start a whole new 'New World Salvia collection'! 
First this will be virtual on my blog, but hopefully I will soon be able to grow all these lovely plants into a fantastic collection in reality!

0 comments on this article - view comments
February's Conservation Feature

HPS member Sue Ward spotted Phlox paniculata 'Bosvigo Pink' growing in the garden of Bosvigo House near Truro, Cornwall in the early 1990's

0 comments on this article - view comments
On a Chalk Hillside January 2019

I may have mentioned in my earlier pieces about creating the pond how certain plants overwhelm the space allotted (and indeed every other space) and have to be removed completely – I’m thinking Typha minima here particularly – but it is staggering to me how vigorous waterplants are in their growth when you think they are either freefloating in just water, or anchored into very very poor soil in the margins. 

1 comments on this article - view comments
My Wildlife Allotment January 2019

I love frosty mornings on the allotment. Everything looks magically transformed with ice crystals covering every leaf, stem and seed head, all sparkling in the first rays of sunshine ...

2 comments on this article - view comments
Shade Monthly October 2018

We tried the ginger lilies. They were not a success. They lasted about three years, looking a little worse each year before finally disappearing. Therefore, when we received seed of H. spicatum CC7004 as part of a share of one of Chris Chadwell’s expeditions in about 2008 we did not hold out much hope. However they ...

Read more ...

 

 

0 comments on this article - view comments
January's Conservation Feature

Hemerocallis 'Hyde Hall' is not a particularly old cultivar nor was it widely available commercially - the name is only 'tentatively accepted' by the RHS and it does not appear in the Plant Finder. 

0 comments on this article - view comments
Last Month in My Garden, December 2018

After three years, this is the last of ‘Last Month in my Garden’. You can continue to see some of the developments on my ‘Brockamin Garden’ facebook page and Brockamin will be open for the NGS on February 17th (11-4), March 24th (2-5) and September 22nd (2-5). The HPS Pulmonaria Group will be visiting on March 23rd. ...

4 comments on this article - view comments
My Wildlife Allotment December 2018

I got my first allotment, a full plot, in 2010 but quickly ran out of space as I am an avid plant collector. A few years later I acquired a half plot, followed by a third allotment, another full plot, in April this year. I now have a growing space of 625 m2. ...

5 comments on this article - view comments
Shade Monthly September 2018

The solution to last month's puzzle is Impatiens omeiana. This is an excellent, spreading, low growing foliage plant for moist soil in shade. There are forms with silvered ...

Read more ...

 

 

 

0 comments on this article - view comments
On a Chalk Hillside December 2018

When we created the terrace for the pond, you may remember we also created a space down one side that was to be the bog garden, with a separate Gunnera manicata bed below it, but attached. 

0 comments on this article - view comments
December's Conservation Feature

The final Conservation Feature of 2018 is an appeal for information about two plants that seem to have disappeared from cultivation. 

0 comments on this article - view comments
Last Month in My Garden, November 2018

When I first came to this garden (1980) there were flycatchers, blackcaps, warblers and goldcrests. I saw one of the last a few weeks ago but, otherwise, none of those birds visit now. ...

0 comments on this article - view comments
On the Menu for ...November 2018

Here in rural Norfolk, the chives are still flowering as if it’s summer, as are the delphiniums and geraniums. New blooms are opening on roses and mingling with plump glossy red hips. Winter is taking its time to arrive; it clearly hasn’t read the barrage of reports screaming that next week our gardens will be at the mercy of plummeting temperatures, snow and ice. 

3 comments on this article - view comments
On a Chalk Hillside November 2018

You saw the berries of the Guelder Rose already red in June this year in my piece last month, and I thought I would look at other berries, hips and haws that are in my garden.  I think of these as autumn colours, but some appear earlier than that, even in years without a drought or heatwave to extra stress the plants, though they don’t usually become noticeable until autumn when there is less colour around them.

0 comments on this article - view comments
Hardy Chrysanthemum Booklet Launch

The Hardy Chrysanthemum booklet provides all the information required to know and grow these wonderful plants together with an extensive list of cultivars and a huge array of photographs.  The booklet is available through the HPS website at £5.50 for members and £7.50 non-members.


Showing only recent postings

© Hardy Plant Society 2019. Web design by CWS

This site uses cookies to store some information.

Close